Station Eternity by Mur Lafferty

Station Eternity by Mur Lafferty

Amateur detective Mallory Viridian’s talent for solving murders ruined her life on Earth and drove her to live on an alien space station, but her problems still follow her in this witty, self-aware novel that puts a speculative spin on murder mysteries, from the Hugo-nominated author of Six Wakes.

From idyllic small towns to claustrophobic urban landscapes, Mallory Viridian is constantly embroiled in murder cases that only she has the insight to solve. But outside of a classic mystery novel, being surrounded by death doesn’t make you a charming amateur detective, it makes you a suspect and a social pariah. So when Mallory gets the opportunity to take refuge on a sentient space station, she thinks she has the solution. Surely the murders will stop if her only company is alien beings. At first her new existence is peacefully quiet…and markedly devoid of homicide.

But when the station agrees to allow additional human guests, Mallory knows the break from her peculiar reality is over. After the first Earth shuttle arrives, and aliens and humans alike begin to die, the station is thrown into peril. Stuck smack-dab in the middle of an extraterrestrial whodunit, and wondering how in the world this keeps happening to her anyway, Mallory has to solve the crime—and fast—or the list of victims could grow to include everyone on board….

Scenes from the Underground by Gabriel Cholette

Scenes from the Underground by Gabriel Cholette

Featuring full-colour illustrations, Scenes from the Underground is the fully uninhibited field notes of the club scene.

I have just heard for the first time the expression “to make soup”: it means to mix the bottom-of-the-pocket drugs of everyone huddled in the club toilet stall, opened MD, ketamine, old dry speed, crushed e pills, to make big lines that will let us forget the past forty-eight hours that have been so difficult.

In Instagram-style vignettes that span Montreal, New York, and Berlin, our narrator — a doctoral student in medieval studies — leads us through the bathrooms and back rooms of clubs and raves as he explores the sex, drugs, and music that define queer nightlife.

Accompanied by Jacob Pyne’s full-colour illustrations, which perfectly punctuate the narrator’s occasional self-destructive melancholy, Scenes from the Underground delivers the fully uninhibited field notes of the club scene.

Which Side Are You On by Ryan Lee Wong

Which Side Are You On by Ryan Lee Wong

How can we live with integrity and pleasure in this world of police brutality and racism? An Asian American activist is challenged by his mother to face this question in this powerful—and funny—debut novel of generational change, a mother’s secret, and an activist’s coming-of-age

 

Cry Perfume by Sadie Dupuis

Cry Perfume by Sadie Dupuis

Lyrical poems that engage with grief and loss and the toll of overdose and addiction with an activist bent.

The title of Cry Perfume is an imperative to bottle sorrow in a beautiful vessel and shed the chemicals that cloud your sight. Written over a four-year period on tour and after losing loved ones and peers to overdose, Dupuis funneled complicated grief into harm reduction advocacy, working to fundraise for and distribute overdose prevention resources in venues internationally.

The slick performativity of pop, punk humor, electronic glitch and sampling, and the surprising leaps of improvisation influence these poems, but beyond music, these poems are informed by Dupuis’s larger concerns about justice and organizing. Cry Perfume is a hopeful but realistic inventory of the virtues and evils that emerge when arts and tech collide. Those dualities are cloaked in the same sparkling fragrance, and there are twinned pleasures and regrets in parting the smokescreen.

When They Tell You To Be Good: A Memoir by Prince Shakur

When They Tell You To Be Good: A Memoir by Prince Shakur

A TIME, Poets & Writers, Publishers Weekly, them, The Week, Book Riot, Book and Film Globe, and Debutiful Best Book of Fall

Winner of the Hurston/Wright Crossover Award

Prince Shakur’s debut memoir brilliantly mines his radicalization and self-realization through examinations of place, childhood, queer identity, and a history of uprisings.

 

Balladz by Sharon Olds

Balladz by Sharon Olds

LONGLISTED FOR THE 2022 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR POETRY • Songs from our era of communal grief and reckoning—by the Pulitzer Prize and T. S. Eliot Prize for Poetry winner, called “a poet for these times, a powerful woman who won’t back down” (San Francisco Chronicle).

Be Very Afraid of Kanako Inuki! by Kanako Inuki

Be Very Afraid of Kanako Inuki! by Kanako Inuki

From the mind of Japan’s “queen of horror manga” comes a short story collection sure to put a grin on your face and send a chill down your spine. Survive six of the author’s hand-picked scares, plus original commentary from the author.

 

Such Sharp Teeth by Rachel Harrison

Such Sharp Teeth by Rachel Harrison

A young woman in need of a transformation finds herself in touch with the animal inside in this gripping, incisive novel from the author of Cackle and The Return.

 

The Whalebone Theatre by Joanna Quinn

The Whalebone Theatre by Joanna Quinn

A transporting, irresistible debut novel that takes its heroine, Cristabel Seagrave, from a theatre in the gargantuan cavity of a beached whale into undercover operations during World War II—a story of love, family, bravery, lost innocence, and self-transformation.